1: all fungi are edible.
2: some fungi are only edible once
Terry Pratchett (via bableman)

(via ledusthroughthenight)

… And that wherever they might be they always remember that the past was a lie, that memory has no return, that every spring gone by could never be recovered, and that the wildest and most tenacious love was an ephemeral truth in the end.
One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel García Márquez (via fuckyeahexistentialism)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

Frederic Edwin Church + Light

American, Hudson River School (1826-1900)

(via fyeahgothicromance)

deadplantsdied:

Gustav Klimt - Life and death

deadplantsdied:

Gustav Klimt - Life and death

(via ledusthroughthenight)

nycartscene:

opens Apr 17, 6-8p:

Day by Day, Good Day
 Peter Dreher

Koenig & Clinton Gallery, 459 W19th St., NYC

a historical exhibition presenting paintings from 1974-2012. Dreher began his series Tag um Tag Guter Tag (Day by Day, Good Day) after painting his first glass in 1972. Dreher continued rendering a single empty water glass repeatedly, by day and by night, and has continued doing so over the course of several decades. The title of the series is linked to a Zen Buddhist maxim that espouses the equanimity of all things and objective perception of the world. Schooled as a figurative painter, the artist has remained steadfast to this commitment over the years, painting the same glass, within the same surroundings, from the same angle every day. To date, the series includes nearly 5,000 individual paintings. - thru May 24

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

actegratuit:

Arsen Roje -  Body Parts

(via aphotovici)

dappledwithshadow:

Two Cypresses, Vincent van Gogh
1889

dappledwithshadow:

Two Cypresses, Vincent van Gogh

1889

(via aphotovici)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Shintaro Ohata  Seamlessly Blends Sculpture and Canvas to Create 3D Paintings

When first viewing the artwork of Shintaro Ohata up close it appears the scenes are made from simple oil paints, but take a step back and you’re in for a surprise. Each piece is actually a hybrid of painted canvas and sculpture that blend almost flawlessly in color and texture to create a single image.

(via tmaylu)

moarrrmagazine:

Vegetabowls 
handmade ceramic bowls from New York

(via sophharris)

favorite movies: the silence of the lambs

“Quid pro quo. I tell you things, you tell me things.”

(via tardispants)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

 The Ghostly Sculptures of Bruno Walpoth

Ghostly sculptures of Bruno Walpoth. Life-size, his powdered beauties, as if in opposition to their ghostly stature, seem heavy and grounded, their gazes locking whomever sees them into a spiritual arrest.

Working with traditional sculptural methods, Walpoth’s work is almost alchemical in quality.  Muscles, eyes and fingers that have been carved into wood (lime and walnut) or covered with lead leaf foils, seem soft and supple, sad and pensive. Idealistically beautiful, his figures show signs of bones and sinew under fragile skin.

Marks from carving tools show on the surface of the wooden bodies, and serve as quiet reminders that these creatures are not human. The marks break what anthropomorphizing has taken place and the observer is introduced to (or reminded of) the artist.  In a strange way, that break makes these works even more fascinating; they make clearly visible the love that has been passed from the creator to the created.

“Contrary to Geppetto, who constructed himself a child (Pinocchio) out of a piece of wood to banish his loneliness, Bruno Walpoth attempts, perhaps out of awareness of life’s transience, to immortalize the volatile spark of youthfulness he catches in the eyes of his models – sometimes his own children – into a wooden sculpture,” writes Absolute Art Gallery‘s Diana Gadaldi.  Walpoth’s figures are also reminiscent of the children in the paintings of Dino Valls and Gottfried Helnwein, yet are not so tortured nor forced into adulthood.  They are more ghostly, or perhaps more Buddhist, as if silently accepting of a new maturity.  Ms. Gadaldi also states that “[they] seem to be immersed in a moment of intimate meditation. Their detached attitude and dreamy expression are characteristic for the stage of life they are going through: one of slow but inexorable physical and psychological development. As they evolve from children to adolescents and from adolescents to young adults, the first traces of self-consciousness and emotional involvement appear on their often still infantile faces.”

http://www.walpoth.com/wood.html

http://www.modernism.ro/2012/02/19/ghostly-sculptures-of-bruno-walpoth/

(via hifructosemag)